Filter by

Clear all

Filter by

Filter by
0 active filtersClear all

10 reasons to use Lallemand Dry Brewing Yeast
The remarkable stability of dry yeast allows for significant QC testing in order to ensure less than 1 bacterium or wild yeast cell detected per million cells of brewing yeast. For most strains, 1g of dry yeast contains a minimum of 5 billion viable cells, but the number will vary slightly from batch to batch.
AB Vickers Protofine™ Optimization Best Practice
This document serves as a guide for performing an optimization test with AB Vickers Protofine™. Optimization tests will allow you to decide the dosage rate at which you will get the best results. The doc will help with understanding the materials needed and a step-by-step process for optimization.
Bacteria Souring Methods Best Practice
Modern sour beer making methods employ the use of bacteria (usually lactic acid bacteria and brewing yeast) to produce a very clean and drinkable sour beer in a relatively short amount of time. This document reviews the different methods utilized by brewers for souring with bacteria. 
Download documentation
Best Practice – Sourvisiae®
Mascoma Sourvisiae® is a modern fermentation solution that produces sour beers through one simple fermentation step. There is no need to pre-sour the wort, so the production process is fast, simple, and consistent.
Best Practices – Copper Fining Optimisation
This document walks you step-by-step through the process of optimizing your AB Vickers copper fining additions.
Best Practices – Biotransformation
Recent research is uncovering how different yeast strains can influence flavor and aroma by interacting with specific hop-derived flavor compounds, a process called biotransformation. Non-aromatic compounds derived from hops are transformed by yeast enzymes to release aromatic flavor compounds in the beer.
Best Practices – Bottle conditioning with CBC-1
This document covers fermentation, priming and bottling, and conditioning.
Best Practices – Brut IPA procedure
Brut IPA is a beer style honouring characteristics from one of the world’s best-loved sparkling wines, Champagne. “Brut” is one of the driest forms of champagne wine and heavily influences the conventions of this modern IPA; pale in colour, dry finish and highly aromatic. Residual sugars, malt character, and complexity are not desired but an extra dry finish is complimented with a highly intense aroma, derived from significant late and dry hop additions whilst minimizing bitterness. The key and defining character of the Brut IPA is full attenuation, which can be achieved with the addition of ABV Glucoamylase 400 (AMG enzyme) throughout the brewing process as per our recommended procedure below.
Best Practices – Diastaticus
Diastaticus is found in many environments. Because of this, cleaning and sanitation are highly important. We encourage you to speak with your local chemical representatives to establish a cleaning and sanitation regimen conducive to your brewery and specific needs.
Best Practices – Dry yeast viability & pitching rates
Prior to drying, the yeast is conditioned to be resistant to dehydration and rehydration. Nevertheless, some weaker cells are killed during the drying process. A typical dry yeast sample contains 60-80% viable cells and the remaining dead yeast cells contribute additional sterols, nitrogen, vitamins, and minerals to aid the fermentation.